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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, your life is short. if you criticize the pashtuns, the taliban will come after you. i want ask abdul, do you have protection if you say something that the taliban does not like? because we know karzai's brother was a big man in afghanistan and anytime someone criticized, that person never sees the day of life again. afghanis are good people, but the reality of freedom of press to me is like a joke. you cannot have freedom of press in afghanistan. afghanistan is based on tribe. -- based on tribes. host: can you hang on the line while we get an answer and then come back to you? guest: i think what john is saying is really not the reality of afghanistan. i would put it this way. i don't know if he can get the kind of subscription we have in afghanistan. you can go to my facebook, twitter, and also to my blog and see what i am doing. how i as a reporter, in a normal citizen, a journalist, criticize the government, criticized karzai, criticized -- the way people are somehow creating the problems, it does not mean what they are pashtuns or -- anyone, criticizing just coming and killing peo
to the region. >> the army in pakistan has held a massive funeral for the soldiers killed in a taliban attack on saturday. the taliban says that the attack was in response to a u.s. drone strike from last month. sectarian violence led to dismissal of the local government back in january. the central government has taken over, but she a muslims say that they are still being attacked -- shia muslims say they are still being attacked. >> for these men, there are no words. again the community mourns. this time it was for a police officer who shot for being a shia muslim. according to one estimate, over the last 10 years nearly 3000 [indiscernible] shia have been killed in violent acts. every month, the violence continues. january 10, two massive bomb blasts ripped through the streets, killing over 100 people. 86 people have been found and their bodies have been buried, but 17 are still missing and locals say that they will never find them, that their bodies will disburse far too wide in the aftermath of the attack. the rebuilding and damage is still clear from the grief felt by this community. >>
a taliban terrorist in california, pay raise. no, freeze for three years. over the last five years one i.c.e. agent killed, one secret service agent killed, three a.t.f. agents killed, one d.e.a. agent killed, two u.s. marshals killed, air traffic controller to put the safety for my family and your family and our constituents as they fly through the sky, the n.i.h. my family has been devastated my cancer. my father died at cancer. my mother died of cancer and it's impacted on my family. dr. collins, who mapped the human genome system that will save many of you and your lives and your sons and daughters because of basically following that system, working on liver cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, which my mom died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west wh
in attacks by the taliban and other insurgents including roadside bombings. attacks by multinational forces or afghan security troops were responsible for 316 deaths or about 11% of the total. >>> western and arab nations are leading donors to palestinians. but due to the current economic down turn, the present level of economic assistance is insufficient to meet needs. palestinians are turning to asia to gain knowledge and experience from the region which will lead to economic growth. we explain. >> reporter: these people in the gaza strip are jubilant after being provided new homes. saudi arabia finances the construction. nearly half of the 4.3 million residents in palestine are refugees. they lost their land and homes through the establishment of israel and during arab/israeli wars. many nations have provided money through u.n. organizations of those in difficulty. assistance was built schools and hospitals. palestinians want to change their dependence on foreign aid. last year, the u.n. general assembly upgraded palestine's status to nonmember state. this has motivated residents to try
in attacks by the taliban and other insurgents, including roadside bombings. attacks by multinational forces or afghan security troops were responsible for 316 deaths, or about 11% of the total. >>> western and arab nations are leading donors to palestinians. however, due to the economic downturn in the west, the present level of financial assistance is insufficient to meet their needs. palestinians are now turning to asia. they believe they can gain knowledge and experience from the region, which will lead to economic growth. nhk world's kohei tsuji explains. ♪ >> reporter: these people in the gaza strip are jubilant after being provided new homes. saudi arabia financed the construction. nearly half of the 4.3 million residents in palestine are refugees. they lost their land and homes through the establishment of israel and during arab-israeli wars. many nations have provided money through u.n. organizations for those in difficulty. assistance has built schools and hospitals. but palestinians want to change their dependence on foreign aid. last year, the u.n. general assembly upgraded pal
. and soon, the awful odds became clear. these 53 americans were surrounded by more than 300 taliban fighters. what happened next has been described as one of the most intense battles of the entire war in afghanistan. the attackers had the advantage. the high ground, the mountains above. an they were unleashing everything they had. rocket propelled grenades. heavy machine. mort mortars. snipers taking aim. to those americans down below, the fire was coming in from every single direction. they'd never seen anything like it. with gun fire impacting all around him, clint raced to one of the bar racks and grabbed a machine gun. he took aim at one of the enemy machine teams and took it out. a rocket propelled grenade exploded, sending shrapnel in to his hip, his arm and his neck. but he kept fighting. disregarding his own wounds and tending to an injured comrade instead. then over the radio, came words no solder ever wants to hear. enemy in the wire. the taliban had penetrated the camp. they were taking over buildings. the combat was close,
the taliban among them. >> let me get that. we consider those groups, obviously a threat to the united states. they're the groups that we are in a conflict with, authorized by the authorization for use of military force by the congress and those are the groups against which we run our efforts primarily around, in afghanistan. in south asia, and in other parts of the world. that's the focus of the united states effort because those are the groups that threaten the united states. what president karzai is sayi and we e movi to implement that decisions, in support of this, he is saying that afghans should provide for the core security in afghanistan. that they should be in the lead focused against the insurgency which threatens the afghan government. that's the taliban. >> right. >> and but that's what we're training in supporting and resourcing the afghans to do. and so very importantly, this may, may of 2013, 2013, the mission, the focus of the u.s. forces and the isap forces, the international forces working with the united states will change. and as of may of 2013, these forces, our forces wi
enough after the united states leaves to with stan the taliban and the taliban is able to gain somewhat approaching the power they had previously when they had power, that they would welcome al-qaeda back. >> well, you know, one of the big questions that has not been answered by the president's advisors is what's the american military presence going to be after 2014. in the state of the union, he said we'll be down basically by half a year from now. there are 66,000 now. at the end of the february next year it will be 32,000. but what happens after 2014 when the so-called war is over and there are a whole number of options on the table, anywhere i'd say from 3,000 troops to 10,000 troops or 9,000 troops. and also the capabilities that could be kept in the country from the u.s. side counterterrorism error and all that. so i think what military posture the u.s. agrees to keep in after 2014, and that will effect what nato agrees to do, are the non-u.s. part of nato i think will have a big effect what happens in afghanistan in terms of this question. we should be able to preclude that if th
organization. it belongs to no state. attacking states, laying low state government, defeating the taliban, al qaeda, making war in it will not stop it because terrorism like steanlt like markets are independenter in their character. what we have created beginning of the 21st century is a deep symmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent global cross frontier and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that a symmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years ago in copenhagen and going through mexico city and due by and recent meetings where 180 or 190 nations came together to renew the protocol already out of date in term of the ecological challenges but to embrace that now and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to intern
and killed a police officer there protecting the workers. the taliban commander by way of background banned the vaccinations. says at least ten health care workers have been killed since december. pakistan, one of just three countries where polio remains a threat. >>> and kazakhstan, talks are under way about iran's nuclear program. there are representative there's from iran, germany, and the five permanent members of the united nations security council. the u.s., france, britain, russia, china. since last round of talks last june, iran's uranium enrichment program has expanded violating u.n. resolutions. >> iran's claiming its program is for civilian use only, energy and such things but western leaders fear iran is building a nuclear bomb. >>> canada, a group of scientists is now calling for food to be dna tested to make sure these things, products, are what they say they really are. >> now paula newton will report test willing keep horse meat from ending up in beef products and other types of food fraud. >> reporter: with all of the new food scares i bet you're wondering if there's any wa
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
stories making news. good news for the pakistani school girl who narrowly survived a taliban attack last fall. she is say nominee for the nobel peace prize. she was targeted for efforts to promote education. if you have a twitter account, now is a good time to change the password. hackers broke into 250,000 accounts snagging user names and e-mail addresses and passwords. twitter insist that is the site is secure. this weekend marks the 1 understand hundredth anniversary of the grand central terminal. the world's largest train station and also one of new york's popular tourist attracts. happy birthday, grand central. the super bowl takes center stage this weekend down in new orleans and living rooms across this country. last yore's big game was the most watched television event in u.s. history. for the city of new orleans, two big parties to be just what the doctor ordered. nbc's jay gray drew the short straw. le is hanging out in new orleans at the super bowl and then mardi gras back to back in the big easy. how will all the festivities be for the ongoing recovery? >> that's interesting
settlement with the taliban parts would that be useful? >> well, first of all i think the terrible bomb blast do underline what i think emphasized throughout the presentation is that terrorism remains one of the most serious threats we face, and this is one of the issues united states and india has worked on closely together. i'm not sure that it could be homegrown terrorism. we have had a number of tax which have been traced to inspiration outside the country i don't know yet. we will have to wait until the investigation reports are being completed. but counterterrorism certainly has attracted the attention of our government at the highest levels. we have developed a number of new mechanisms, both in terms of intelligence, in terms of the coordination between central government and the states because policing the estate subject. and, indeed, for instant checking and working out -- but like every other country, we are on the frontline of terrorism. we perhaps a little more than others, and we need to reinforce our efforts. and we will certainly be hoping to work very closely with our u.s. par
teenagers, generally want to stop at the time they're 30 and 20 taliban it's bad for them, you remind them of the fact that they couldn't control their own destiny so they get anxious, and what did they do? facebook. it's a coping mechanism. we get a large trial at colombia university sponsored by the nih. wanting as with which we can have depressed people in the trial. we had to cancel the trial but we couldn't find a single smoker who was not clinically depressed. the fundamental insight yet again is what to do to help these folks? i would argue that you take a couple different paths. one is show them what's happening. this is what a smoker's lung looks like. you can't hide from the. just look at the darn thing. at 11:00 you see that? as emphysema. the dark tar deposits is pretty evident as well from the cigarettes. and when you see that you have awareness and understanding why this matters to you. but the second insight you have, we offer is there certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control of people who come in for surgery. i've done my
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)